violence in schools reflects sa communities cosas - Violence in schools reflects SA communities: Cosas

Violence in schools reflects SA communities: Cosas

The Congress of South African Students says the ongoing violent incidents in schools is a result of the violence displayed in communities.

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young people share mixed sentiments on youth days significance - Young people share mixed sentiments on Youth Day’s significance

Young people share mixed sentiments on Youth Day’s significance

Young people in the Free State say the youth of 1976 opened doors for them and they will do everything in their power to take advantage of opportunities available for them.

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usa walk past chile 3 0 - USA walk past Chile 3-0

USA walk past Chile 3-0

Carli Llyod

The USA looked like they were going to repeat their historic feast of five days ago when they beat Thailand 13-0. The Defending World Cup champions however did beat Chile 3-0, in their Group F match played at the Parc des Princes Stadium in Paris, France.

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massive south american blackout 44 million without power 1024x683 - Massive South American blackout, 44 million without power

Massive South American blackout, 44 million without power

Buenos Aires – A massive blackout left more than 44 million people without electricity in Argentina and Uruguay on Sunday after an unexplained failure in the neighbouring countries’ interconnected power grid. Authorities were working frantically to restore power but only about a half a million in Argentina had electricity back by early afternoon.

Voters cast ballots by the light of cellphones in gubernatorial elections in Argentina. Public transportation halted, shops closed and patients dependent on home medical equipment were urged to go to hospitals with generators.

"I was just on my way to eat with a friend, but we had to cancel everything. There’s no subway, nothing is working," said Lucas Acosta, a 24-year-old Buenos Aires resident. "What’s worse, today is Father’s Day. I’ve just talked to a neighbor and he told me his sons won’t be able to meet him."

In Uruguay, power was being more steadily restored, with lights back on in at least three regions by early afternoon. Officials said they expected most of the country of 3 million people to have light back soon.

Argentina’s power grid is generally known for being in a state of disrepair, with substations and cables that were insufficiently upgraded as power rates remained largely frozen for years.

The country’s energy secretary said the blackout occurred around 7 a.m. local time when a key interconnection system collapsed, but the causes were "being investigated and are not yet determined."

A subway employee stands in the closed entrance of the Buenos Aires’s subway during a blackout, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Picture: Tomas F. Cuesta/AP

Brazilian and Chilean officials said their countries had not been affected.

Officials were not immediately available for comment, but many residents of Argentina and Uruguay said the size of the outage was unprecedented in recent history.

"I’ve never seen something like this," said Silvio Ubermann, a taxi driver in the Argentine capital. "Never such a large blackout in the whole country."

Argentine energy company Edesur said on Twitter that it was "slowly beginning to restore" electricity, and power had been returned to 290,000 customers as of Sunday morning, at least some of whom were in the capital.

It said the failure originated at an electricity transmission point between the power stations in Yacyretá and Salto Grande on the Argentine coast.

Uruguayan energy company UTE said the failure in the Argentine system cut power to all of Uruguay at one point and much of Argentina. The company said that some Uruguayan coastal cities had service by early afternoon and blamed the collapse on a "flaw in the Argentine network."

Argentina’s secretary of energy said the power failed at 7:07 a.m. Only the southernmost province of Tierra del Fuego was unaffected.

"The cause is still under investigation," the energy secretary’s office said.

Argentine electric company Edesur said that some 450,000 clients had power restored by 11:53 a.m., with hospitals taking priority. Uruguayan officials did not provide the number of clients with power back, but a growing list of regions with service indicated that restoration was progressing faster there.

Several Argentine provinces had elections for governor on Sunday, which proceeded with voters using their phone screens and built-in flashlights to illuminate their ballots.

"This is the biggest blackout in history, I don’t remember anything like this in Uruguay," said Valentina Giménez, a resident of the capital, Montevideo. She said her biggest concern was that electricity be restored in time to watch the national team play in the Copa America football tournament Sunday evening.

Since taking office, Argentina’s President Mauricio Macri has said that gradual austerity measures were needed to revive the country’s struggling economy. He has cut red tape, and tried to reduce the government’s budget deficit by ordering job cuts and reducing utility subsidies, which he maintained was necessary to recuperate lost revenue due to years-long mismanagement of the electricity sector.

According to the Argentine Institute for Social Development, an average family in Argentina still pays 20 times less for electricity than similar households in neighboring countries.

The subsidies were a key part of the electricity policy of President Néstor Kirchner’s 2003-2007 administration and the presidency of Kirchner’s wife and successor, Cristina Fernández in 2007-2015. Fernandez is now running for vice president in October elections.

AP

johnsons brexit plan would crumble rival for uk pm - Johnson’s Brexit plan would crumble: rival for UK PM

Johnson’s Brexit plan would crumble: rival for UK PM

Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy would collapse under scrutiny, one of his rivals to become Britain’s prime minister said ahead of the first televised debate Sunday which the front-runner is skipping.

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former east london mayor urges youth to embrace education - Former East London mayor urges youth to embrace education

Former East London mayor urges youth to embrace education

Steve Biko Foundation

Former mayor of the East London based Buffalo City Metro, Dr Sindisile Maclean, has encouraged the youth to take their education seriously and to be wary of social ills.

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why pro poor policies on their own wont shift inequality in sa - Why ‘pro-poor’ policies on their own won’t shift inequality in SA

Why ‘pro-poor’ policies on their own won’t shift inequality in SA

Sociologist Goran Therborn has probably influenced the study of inequality more than any other scholar in recent years.

Invited to locate inequality in South Africa in a global perspective, Therborn was emphatic. In terms of income it is “the most unequal country on earth”. 

He proposed that inequality in South Africa (which he calls “extraordinary” and “unique”) derives from settler colonialism, its trajectory and its enduring legacy.’

I want to expand on what Therborn insisted was only a hypothesis, specifying some of the key contributions of the colonial era to the history of inequality. 

But I also argue that the specific nature of capitalism in 20th century South Africa, while profoundly shaped by settler colonialism, is analytically distinct and equally important in shaping the contours of contemporary inequality.

Empire’s civilising mission

During 150 years of Dutch colonial rule, slavery left a deep imprint on poverty and inequality. Slaves and their descendants formed a distinct layer of the poor in the Western Cape. And as the colony expanded north and east, Khoikhoi communities lost their independence through military defeat, disease and the loss of their herds. Through the 18th century, Khoikhoi were absorbed into the frontier economy as a captive workforce.

At the beginning of the 19th century, Britain shouldered aside the moribund Dutch East India Company. British colonial administrators were confident of the “civilising mission” of the empire; and the arrival from the 1820s of British settlers in the eastern Cape introduced a new economic, political and military dynamic. Imperial and settler troops waged a series of increasingly punitive wars against the Xhosa kingdoms.

The loss of land and livestock propelled Xhosa men, women and children into indentured labour. Twentieth century historian and former president of Cornell University Cornelis Willem De Kiewiet – writing 75 years ago – went to the heart of the matter when he wrote:

A crucial period from the 1860s to 1910 was decisively shaped by the mineral revolution and imperial interventions. The discovery of diamonds and then gold saw large mining houses create a labour force with a skilled (white) artisan base and a massive, migrant (black) workforce. British imperial policy sought to control access to the minerals and secure the labour supplies to extract them. A series of wars and annexations completed the conquest of African societies; and the defeat of the Boer republics in the South African War led to the creation of a single territory under British control.

In 1910, by an Act passed in Westminster, South Africa became a British dominion. The Union inherited what became some of the essential institutions of 20th century South Africa. These were the “native reserves”, large-scale migrant labour, segregated urban space, and an increasingly overt subordination of black people to white rule.

After 1910, the new state massively increased its capacities and the economy diversified. By 1948 manufacturing had outstripped both mining and agriculture in its contribution to GDP. South Africa became a mid-ranking industrial power. But this history of economic development had a dark, singular twist. Alone among industrial powers, South Africa did not incorporate the bulk of its working class into its social and political institutions. Black South Africans were systematically excluded from political, educational, legal and welfare systems.

Distinctive social divide

From 1910 to the 1970s – under segregation and apartheid – South African capitalism accommodated itself to this distinctive social divide, which became a key driver of inequality. The consequences are well-known.

Until the 1970s, the real wages of African workers in mining and agriculture stagnated and at times actually fell. Farm workers were an exceptionally exploited group. An even larger proportion of the African population experienced poverty in the reserves (subsequently bantustans or homelands). Black city dwellers experienced less acute poverty than their rural cousins. The mass provision of township housing provided modest material and welfare gains, but created an insecure and violent environment.

Throughout these years, successive governments not only inhibited black economic advancement, but also buttressed white privileges. State services for white families – in education, healthcare and housing – widened racial disparities in income and wealth. During the heyday of apartheid – from 1948 to 1973 – a period of growth and stability saw white living standards rise dramatically.

By the 1970s, however, the apartheid project was in deep trouble, regionally, politically and economically. Growth stalled, inflation rose, an intense balance of payments crisis set in. From the OPEC crisis of 1973 to 1994, South Africa’s economic performance was dismal. Capital responded – it had to, given the stark failure of the existing low-wage, low skills growth path. The real wages of black workers in manufacturing and in mining rose sharply – but there was a strong shift to replace labour. Manufacturing, agriculture and mining all embraced mechanisation – and shed jobs.

An historic transition took place: a shift from labour shortages to a labour surplus, generating structural unemployment upon a massive scale. Between 1970 and 1980, unemployment spiralled tenfold: from about half a million to 5.1 million people. Among the jobless millions, those who were less educated, less skilled and less urbanised had scant prospects of finding work. Structural unemployment became a savage new source of inequality.

De-racialised affluence

Politically, 1994 was a watershed moment. But economically and socially there were significant continuities from the late apartheid years to the post-apartheid present. Social grants and the provision of housing and services to townships have reduced levels of income poverty. But inequality has actually increased since 1994.

Two factors have intensified inequality: increasingly concentrated income and wealth; and a sharp rise of inequality within the African population. In 1993 the wealthiest decile of the population earned 54% of national income; by 2008 their share had risen to over 58%. The poorer 50% of the population saw its share fall from 8.3% to 7.85%.

Wealth is even more unequally shared than income. Within the African population, the emergence of a well-to-do middle-class minority has been rapid and today about half of the wealthiest decile are black. In post-apartheid South Africa, affluence has been de-racialised; poverty and inequality have remained stubbornly racialised.

Inequality was forged by settler colonialism and racial capitalism; its persistence in such acute form reflects the distribution of power (and the resources and opportunities conferred by power) in society.

Tackling inequality therefore involves more than “pro-poor” policies: it needs changing the social processes and relations that underpin it.

* The article is based on a chapter in a book, Poverty & Inequality: Diagnosis, Prognosis and Responses

* Colin Bundy is an Honorary Fellow of Green Templeton College at University of Oxford

* The views expressed here are not necessarily those of Independent Media.

The Conversation

The Conversation

zikalala encourages youth to avoid social ills - Zikalala encourages youth to avoid social ills

Zikalala encourages youth to avoid social ills

Sihle Zikalala

KwaZulu-Natal Premier Sihle Zikalala has urged young people to avoid teenage pregnancy and substance abuse and start their own businesses.

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youth must take advantage of opportunities ramaphosa - Youth must take advantage of opportunities: Ramaphosa

Youth must take advantage of opportunities: Ramaphosa

President Cyril Ramaphosa

President Cyril Ramaphosa has paid tribute to the youth of 1976, describing that generation as brave young men and women who declared a war against oppression.

The post Youth must take advantage of opportunities: Ramaphosa appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

india hikes tariffs on us imports following withdrawal of trade privileges 1024x577 - India hikes tariffs on US imports following withdrawal of trade privileges

India hikes tariffs on US imports following withdrawal of trade privileges

India on Sunday imposed higher tariffs on 28 items imported from the United States, in retaliation to Washington’s recent withdrawal of trade privileges for New Delhi.

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pakistan pm tells cricket team to banish fear of losing - Pakistan PM tells cricket team to banish fear of losing

Pakistan PM tells cricket team to banish fear of losing

Pakistani opposition politician Imran Khan speaks with party leaders at his home in Bani Gala, outside Islamabad, Pakistan.

India and Pakistan go head-to-head in a World Cup blockbuster at Old Trafford in Manchester, England, in a match expected to be watched on television around the world by over one billion people.

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six burnt beyond recognition in limpopo collision 1024x577 - Six burnt beyond recognition in Limpopo collision

Six burnt beyond recognition in Limpopo collision

Six people have burnt beyond recognition after a head-on collision between Giyani and Polokwane in Limpopo on Sunday morning. 

The post Six burnt beyond recognition in Limpopo collision appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

hundreds gather in durban for international day of yoga - Hundreds gather in Durban for International Day of Yoga

Hundreds gather in Durban for International Day of Yoga

Hundreds of people from all walks of life have gathered at the Durban Amphitheatre on the beachfront to participate in International Day of Yoga celebrations.

The post Hundreds gather in Durban for International Day of Yoga appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

sa just not cutting it uk barber - SA just not cutting it – UK barber

SA just not cutting it – UK barber

A visit to the barber is usually the first sign that you’ve been on tour for a while. This week it was my turn.

Not one to frequent the salons in the malls, preferring the experience of an authentic barbershop, I made my way to Grangetown, just south of the Cardiff City Centre.


A former local Welsh working-class area, with terraced-housing, Grangetown is now on the rise, having been transformed into a multi-social area where kebab shops and vegan cafés now co-exist.

Sitting down in the chair at “FreeStyle”, I expected the usual questions like “Where you are from mate?” and “What brings you to Cardiff?”.

What I didn’t expect, though, was that my response would incite “Why your is your team so crap, mate?”


That was met with shrieks of laughter throughout the barbershop. Yes, so it’s not only the Proteas players that are abused, but also a travelling South African journalist too.


“Ahmed”, the guy cutting my hair, really enjoyed the banter. Having lived in Cardiff for 40 years since moving from Karachi, he loves his cricket too. And watching South Africa, “who were always very good”, take a pounding here has really made his day.

I promised him South Africa would get better, and beat Afghanistan to kickstart the campaign. He wasn’t that hopeful, particularly with the copious amounts of rain that has fallen.

The weather really has been a talking point at this World Cup. Three matches have been abandoned the past seven days, including South Africa’s clash against the West Indies in Southampton.


It is the most amount of matches ever at a World Cup, eclipsing the amount at the 1992 and 2003 events. It has been so bad that ICC Chief Executive David Richardson had to put out a statement on why no reserve-days have been set aside for the group matches here.

It certainly has rained a lot in Cardiff since I arrived. A steady shower has greeted us every day. It has kept the Proteas indoors mostly this past week, although there was a brief period of respite that allowed the players to train under lights in preparation for the Afghanistan fixture.

Locals, though, are keeping an eye on the weather this weekend for an altogether different reason. Sir Elton John is in town for a once-off performance in Cardiff and there is a great concern that the sold-out concert may be rained off.

That would be particularly disappointing for at least two people. Former Star Night Editor and Men’s Health SA Editor Ridwaan Bawa and his wife, Shihaam, surprisingly popped into Cardiff on a whirlwind two-night stay just to see the legendary pianist and song writer. Bawa, who now lives in Qatar, rang me up and was thoroughly enjoyable to catch up over a fine Turkish dinner at Saray chatting about all things Indy Media.

Armed with Qatari Riyals, dinner was of course on the Bawas for the evening. I responded by “organising” some tickets for the game, before the concert gets underway in the evening.

As we departed, he was convinced South Africa would still be standing, and that sun wouldn’t go down on the Proteas at this World Cup. I am just praying the sun comes out!


@ZaahierAdams


IOL Sport

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police investigating theft of 50 computers at cput 576x1024 - Police investigating theft of 50 computers at CPUT

Police investigating theft of 50 computers at CPUT

Cape Town – Western Cape police have launched an investigation after thieves broke into a building at CPUT and stole 50 computers.

The incident occurred on Friday night at the institution’s Cape Town campus.

According to police, thieves entered through the student centre before making their way into the computer centre in the design building, and left with the computers in three vehicles.

CPUT spokesperson Lauren Kansley said police are investigating the matter.

“We have reported the theft of around 50 computers from a building at our District Six campus,” she said.

Photo: Supplied.

“SAPS are following up on a number of leads and our internal investigations are also under way.”

Although the institution couldn’t indicate the value of the stolen computers, Weekend Argus understands the devices were Apple Macs with an estimated value of more than R30 000 per computer. 

Weekend Argus

winde promises youth more access to education skills development - Winde promises youth more access to education, skills development

Winde promises youth more access to education, skills development

Western Cape Premier Alan Winde says youth unemployment in the country is unacceptably high. He says education and skills development are the key to unlocking the future for many young people.

The post Winde promises youth more access to education, skills development appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

more than a game world cup set for india pakistan blockbuster 1024x573 - More than a game: World Cup set for India-Pakistan blockbuster

More than a game: World Cup set for India-Pakistan blockbuster

MANCHESTER The eyes of more than a billion television viewers around the globe will turn to Manchester when arch-rivals India and Pakistan meet on Sunday in the most highly-anticipated group match of the World Cup.

Such was the desire of fans to cheer on their heroes in person that, according to the International Cricket Council’s own figures, there were some 800,000 applications for tickets to watch the match at an Old Trafford ground where the capacity is 26,000.

It’s no wonder then that officials are desperate the match does not fall victim to rain in what is already a record World Cup for washouts.

"India v Pakistan is always a big game – it’s like the final before the final," said Pakistan selection chief Inzamam-ul-Haq. "It’s watched all over the world and whoever wins on Sunday will surely have a big celebration."

This match is all the more eagerly awaited because political pressures have put a stop to India-Pakistan fixtures outside of major tournaments.

India cut off bilateral cricket ties with its neighbour after the 2008 Mumbai terror attacks, which authorities blamed on Pakistani militants.

Pakistan toured India in 2012/13 for a series of one-day internationals and Twenty20 matches but that was their last encounter outside of a multi-national event.

And there were calls for a boycott of Sunday’s match after tensions soared following a deadly incident in the divided territory of Kashmir earlier this year.

In February a suicide bombing in the Indian-administered section, claimed by a militant group based in Pakistan, killed 40 Indian troops.

India and Pakistan then carried out tit-for-tat air strikes.

Remarkably, given the strengths of both sides, India have won all six of their previous World Cup encounters against Pakistan.

India also beat Pakistan in their most recent match at the Asia Cup in the United Arab Emirates last year.

But Pakistan can take heart from the final of the 2017 Champions Trophy in England, when they thrashed India by 180 runs.

Pakistan’s are hoping they will be on the winning side against India. Photo: Rui Vieira/AP Photo

An India team led by star batsman Virat Kohli have lived up to their billing as potential champions with two wins and a washout in three matches so far. 

The number-two ranked side won their opener against South Africa and then beat title-holders Australia before a no result against New Zealand.

Pakistan, by contrast, are struggling in the 10-team event with just one win  an upset against England  two defeats and a washout.

But former batsman Inzamam, a member of the Pakistan team that won the 1992 World Cup, insisted all was not lost for Sarfaraz Ahmed’s side.

"I believe Pakistan have the ability to win the World Cup," he said.

"They haven’t performed too well so far, and Sunday is important for them to stay in the competition."

The stakes are not as high for India but that is unlikely to ease the pressure on Kohli’s men.

"It’s been competitive for years. It’s a marquee event all over the world, and an honour to be a part of the big game," Kohli said. "It brings out the best in all of us."

Some supporters put winning Sunday’s match above seeing their side lift the World Cup trophy.

"We want to win this match even if Kohli loses the Cup, we don’t care," Harron Memon, an India fan in Nottingham, told AFP.

Pakistan, for all their World Cup woes, have won 73 of their 131 one-day internationals against India and one Pakistan fan tweeted: "We have always dominated India in cricket. Call it war or sport, we are certainly going to win it come Sunday."

Former Pakistan captain Wasim Akram, however, urged supporters to keep the match in perspective.

"One team will win, one team will lose, so stay graceful and do not take this as a war," he told AFP in Manchester. 

"Those who project this match as war are not true cricket fans."

Meanwhile former India captain Bishan Singh Bedi, made his own appeal for calm by telling AFP: "May there be peace and tranquility while the two Asian giants fight it out on the cricket field. 

"And may the better team win without losing out on the etiquette of cricket."

AFP

fathersday kagiso rabada and his dad mpho celebrate father and son bond 680x1024 - #FathersDay Kagiso Rabada and his dad Mpho celebrate father and son bond

#FathersDay Kagiso Rabada and his dad Mpho celebrate father and son bond

Cricket legend Kagiso Rabada and his father, Mpho dressed in must-have pieces from Trenery’s Autumn/ Winter collection. Supplied picture.

For this Father’s Day, Trenery has partnered with cricket legend Kagiso Rabada and his father, Mpho, to celebrate the unique bond between father-and-son. In the campaign they are dressed in must-have pieces from Trenery’s Autumn/ Winter collection. 

Dressed in must-have pieces from Trenery’s Autumn/Winter collection, Kagiso (affectionately knownas ‘KG’ among fans), was evidently amused at how naturally his dad took to being in front of the camera. Kagiso meanwhile is used to the spotlight, making his international cricket debut at age 19. Four years into his career, he topped the international player rankings as the Number One fast bowler in the world,and currently holds a position in the Top Three. 

Cricket legend Kagiso Rabada and his father, Mpho dressed in must-have pieces from Trenery’s Autumn/ Winter collection. Supplied picture.

When asked about his son’s record-breaking achievements, Mpho says he is humbled and in awe of Kagiso’s drive to succeed. “He taught me that it is possible to reach heights that even your parents have never thought you could. “Watching his hard work and career has been my biggest pride,” he says.

When asked what his father means to him, Kagiso said his dad played an enormous role in his life and career. “Having a solid father figure is really important. Growing up, he was always there for me,” Kagiso says.

“The most important thing my dad has taught me was to stand up for what I believe in. If you look at all the top athletes, they have a belief and they really, really believe that they can do whatever they set their mind to.” he adds. 

ramaphosa expected to address youth unemployment - Ramaphosa expected to address youth unemployment

Ramaphosa expected to address youth unemployment

President Cyril Ramaphosa will on Sunday commemorate the 43rd anniversary of the Soweto youth uprising of 16 June 1976.
Ramaphosa is expected to deliver the keynote address at the National Youth Day event to be held at the Peter Mokaba Cricket Club in Polokwane, Limpopo Province.

The post Ramaphosa expected to address youth unemployment appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

hamilton sets sights on first non english production - ‘Hamilton’ sets sights on first non-English production

‘Hamilton’ sets sights on first non-English production

After triumphing on Broadway, the lower 48 states and London’s West End, “Hamilton” is eyeing its first non-English production as well as tours throughout Europe and Asia.

The post ‘Hamilton’ sets sights on first non-English production appeared first on SABC News – Breaking news, special reports, world, business, sport coverage of all South African current events. Africa's news leader..

businesswoman nailing the industry 683x1024 - Businesswoman nailing the industry

Businesswoman nailing the industry

DURBAN –  Creating a new dimension to her business, meant taking a leap of faith, writes Liz Clarke

When opportunity knocks, make the most of it. That’s the advice from hairstylist businesswoman, wife and mum, Memory Dzvifu.

She knows from long experience that putting ceilings on yourself stops you from achieving your potential.


“If you say to yourself, I can’t go any higher or achieve anything more, you are doing yourself a disservice” she says, surrounded by nail polishes buffs, files and exotic nail designs. Her shining work table tells you she she has embarked on a new journey in the beauty business.

She explains how it all came about. 

“I have always been a hair stylist and know everything there is to know about hair health and the latest in hair designs. But one day a lady come into my small salon in Hillcrest and said, you do nails, don’t you?”


She admits the enquiry threw her a bit off guard as it was something she was planning to do, but hadn’t got round to doing it. 

Treatment and care of nails a priority.
I could have said nom” she says. “I could have said I only do hair and not manicures, but then that would have put off a potential customer and closed the door on new business, which would have been really silly.”

Dzvifu had to think quickly.

“I remember smiling sweetly and telling her that I was so glad she had made the enquiry, as it was a service that I had planned for a long time and would shortly be introducing. I promised to give her a call as soon as I had everything set up. She thanked me and said she would wait for my call. She said she needed special treatment as her nails were in bad shape after using false nails for too long and needed someone who could help her. I said I was the right person!”


Within days, Dzvifu had enrolled at an accredited training centre in Kloof to learn about the latest techniques in nail care.

“Nail and hand care have always been a priority as hairdressers’ hands are particularly vulnerable. So for me nail beauty had to be combined with nail health, because you can’t have the one without the other. The course wasn’t cheap, but I felt that investing in another avenue of knowledge was the way to go. And I think I was right.”

She says that her training to become a nail technician was one of the toughest things she had every done.


“You just don’t realize how many things can go wrong with your hands and nails. Each nail problem, and there are dozens, have to be treated differently. We often take our hands for granted and yet they require an enormous amount of attention to keep them in working order.”

Spoilt for choice.
It starts, she says, with exfoliation and regular moisturising.

“I think hands give away a person’s age more than anything. We look after our face, but often neglect our hands. For me this was a central part of the learning process.”

The use of a range of bio gels that are not harmful to the delicate nail beds is the treatment and polishing technology Dzvifu has embraced for her business. 


“But it didn’t come easy,” she smiles recalling the hours of practice that was needed to master the application and treatment techniques.

“There were quite a few exams and to gain your certificate of competency meant having to practice nail sculpturing, treatment and polishing on 50 willing candidates. I even used my husband as a guinea pig, which made his colleagues at work laugh. But it was worth all the hard work.” 

Advice these days to her new nail and manicure clients is that achieving the desired nail shape, which is what every woman wants, involves a few challenges in the way. In other words, it is not an overnight miracle.


“Most women have brittle nails that peal and flake or even split, so getting them into shape can take time. There are quick fixes, but they often do more harm than good. I am more interested in the idea of long-term nail health. During the course I saw some nails that had been bitten down to the quick. You’d think there is no way you can make them look like anything, but now I know it is possible to treat unsightly and problem nails. It’s often about building the upper arch of the nail making it durable and beautiful again.”

When Dzvifu contacted the original lady who had enquired whether she could do her nails, she offered her a complimentary session.
“I don’t think she realized what an opportunity she had given me.”

But then this mum of two has always had the knack of seizing opportunities when they arise. When she was younger, she accepted a hairdressing job on board a luxury cruise liner travelling the world. When asked if she knew about sea travel she said, yes of course.

“The truth is that I had never seen a ship let along been on one. But that’s why I say never let ceilings get in the way.”


Hands are a giveaway when it comes to age.


BUSINESS REPORT 
saudi seeks oil supply protection as us and iran face off - Saudi seeks oil supply protection as US and Iran face off

Saudi seeks oil supply protection as US and Iran face off

An oil tanker is seen after it was attacked at the Gulf of Oman.

Iran has denied any role in the strikes on the tankers south of the Strait of Hormuz, a major transit route for oil from Saudi Arabia, the world’s biggest crude exporter, and other Gulf producers.

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semenya refutes reports she shunned rabat race 1024x577 - Semenya refutes reports she shunned Rabat race

Semenya refutes reports she shunned Rabat race

Two-time Olympic champion Caster Semenya’s representatives have reacted angrily after the organiser of the Diamond League event in Morocco said the Olympic champion had refused an invitation to run the 800 metres in Rabat.

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morale boost for proteas as they thrash afghanistan - Morale boost for Proteas as they thrash Afghanistan

Morale boost for Proteas as they thrash Afghanistan

Tahir

The Proteas have recorded their first win at the 2019 Cricket World Cup with a clinical win over Afghanistan. Chasing a very moderate 127 run (D/L) target , the Proteas got the runs in the 27th over, only for the loss of Quinton De Kock . 

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chinas largest ever picasso exhibition opens - China’s largest ever Picasso exhibition opens

China’s largest ever Picasso exhibition opens

The largest Picasso exhibition ever held in China opens on Saturday, featuring more than 100 works — many of them from the artist’s early years.

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forest high learner laid to rest - Forest High learner laid to rest

Forest High learner laid to rest

The funeral of the Forest High School pupil who was stabbed to death, was held at the Portuguese Church in La Rochelle, south of Johannesburg on Saturday. Sixteen-year-old Daniel Bakwela was fatally stabbed outside the school, allegedly by a fellow pupil, Mohamed Mwela.

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cele calls for shut down of hijacked buildings - Cele calls for shut down of hijacked buildings

Cele calls for shut down of hijacked buildings

Police Minister Bheki Cele has called for the shut down of hijacked buildings as they are often believed to be a hive of criminal activities.

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drought forces namibia to auction wild animals - Drought forces Namibia to auction wild animals

Drought forces Namibia to auction wild animals

Drought-hit Namibia has authorised the sale of at least 1 000 wild animals including elephants and giraffes to limit loss of life and generate $1.1 million for conservation, authorities confirmed Saturday.

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mom to face murder charge for dumped babys death 768x1024 - Mom to face murder charge for dumped baby's death

Mom to face murder charge for dumped baby’s death

Cape Town – Despite a plea for clemency, the State has decided to prosecute a 33-year-old mother for allegedly murdering her newborn and then dumping her at a municipal landfill.

The baby’s body was discovered by chance last September by waste-pickers, who reported to police that the baby had head wounds.

Further investigation then allegedly placed the mother, Chirelda Lombard, from Hondeklip Bay, walking towards the dump carrying a backpack.

Although Lombard allegedly hid her pregnancy and initially denied it to police investigators, later DNA testing confirmed she was the biological mother of the dumped baby. That led to her arrest and further investigation at the home where Lombard was house-sitting with her 7-year-old son.

Police removed blood-stained linen and other blood evidence from the home’s blocked sewerage pipes, which allegedly strengthened the prosecution’s case. A till slip found in a Makro plastic bag containing the baby’s body also allegedly incriminated Lombard.

The plaque on a wooden cross revealing the baby’s name as Gabrielle.
The plaque on a wooden cross revealing the baby’s name as Gabrielle.

But she was not held for long and her release from custody after her first court appearance caused an uproar in the village.

“Chirelda Lombard is still not even arrested,” wrote one angry resident on Facebook. “She’s walking nicely around at her parent’s house, not even slept 1 night in a cell don’t understand so nice, how does it work….”

Scorned by villagers, Lombard cut a tragic figure in October last year carrying her baby’s white coffin to her graveside, marked by a neon pink plaque on a wooden cross that revealed her baby’s name was Gabrielle, born on August 30, 2018, died September 4, 2018.

Chirelda Lombard
Chirelda Lombard

The baby’s father was excluded from his child’s funeral. “He dated Chirelda for seven months,” said his attorney, Emdi Swanepoel, who requested that the father’s identity be withheld. “They broke up in January and she wanted nothing more to do with him and never responded to his text messages thereafter.

“So he was dumbstruck when he heard on the grapevine that Chirelda was pregnant and had not told him that she was expecting his child.

“And he was shocked and heartbroken when he heard that his baby was found dead on a rubbish dump. His biggest regret is that Chirelda never involved him.

“He is an upstanding guy and says that if she had, he would have offered to support his daughter or even raise her by himself. He hopes justice will prevail.”

In the months following Lombard’s release, her lawyer, Willie Bouwer, applied to have all charges dropped and was reported in local papers saying nothing would come of the matter.

He refused to elaborate on the substance of his clemency appeal, which was rejected by Northern Cape prosecutors.

“The Director of Public Prosecutions’ decision is that the accused should be prosecuted on two charges, murder and concealment of death,” said spokesperson Phaladi Shuping. “The case will be in the district court on 20 June, 2019, and on that day it will be transferred to the Springbok Regional Court where the trial will be heard.”

Shuping said prosecutors declined to elaborate on the matter of the clemency appeal.

Weekend Argus

brumbies hurricanes brimming with confidence after victories - Brumbies, Hurricanes brimming with confidence after victories

Brumbies, Hurricanes brimming with confidence after victories

Rugby

The ACT Brumbies and Wellington Hurricanes will head into the Super Rugby playoffs brimming with confidence after claiming rousing wins in their final round matches on Saturday.

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ex prisoner arrested for alleged attack on woman in ladysmith - Ex-prisoner arrested for alleged attack on woman in Ladysmith

Ex-prisoner arrested for alleged attack on woman in Ladysmith

Placards of stop sexual violence against women and girls held up

A 44-year-old man has been arrested after he allegedly stabbed a 19-year-old girl during a failed rape attempt in the Matiwane area at Ladysmith, in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands.

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